Training and succession planning

Our policies

Excellent training is key to our sustainability. We manage a variety of formal and informal training programmes designed to deliver the skills required to run a world-class gold mining business.

Informal training is constant in the Randgold culture and includes skills shadowing, mentoring and on the job training. Formal training includes partnership arrangements with top ranking global universities such as Harvard School of Business, London Business School and the Graduate School of Business in Cape Town, as well as executive development certifications such as our ‘finance for non-financial managers’ course.

INDIVIDUAL MINE RETENTION RATES

 

Voluntary turnover

Total turnover

 

2016

2015

2014

2016

2015

2014

Loulo-Gounkoto

2.0%

1.0%

2.0%

4.0%

2.0%

6.0%

Morila

1.0%

0.2%

1.0%

2.0%

15.0%

3.0%

Kibali

2.0%

2.2%

3.0%

3.9%

4.7%

8.6%

Tongon

1.3%

2.6%

2.4%

1.9%

2.8%

6.6%

 

Case Study

EMPLOYEE CASE STUDY SPOTLIGHTS: A MISSION TO KEEP LEARNING

Fiston Asimade
Fiston is a 30 year old from the Watsa region near our Kibali mine in the DRC. He joined Randgold in 2010 during the construction of the mine, helping initially on the construction for the Kokiza village relocation. During that time Fiston proved himself to be an enthusiastic and skilled worker, and he was invited to take part in testing and, based on the results, was sent to Tongon to learn about gold processing and train in metallurgy. 

Fiston explains, “I am proud to have learned metallurgy and to work for Randgold. And my family are proud of me too, we were all excited when I went to Tongon because I had never left DRC before. At school I graduated with a diploma in maths and physics but we had no money for me to go to university. This has been an opportunity for me to do well, so I am working hard. I never thought I would get an opportunity like this in my life.”

Fiston’s hard work has paid off, he has excelled at his job and was promoted from reagent operator to supervisor, and he is determined to progress further. “I am on a mission to keep learning, I want to become a foreman and then a head of department, and I also want to develop agriculture in our community. Before Kibali Durba was a village, now it is a town. We used to have huts but now we have houses with iron roofs. We have good schools and hospitals. We can see more opportunities for the future and I want to help with that.”

He adds, “There are more opportunities for the future and my children will be well educated, they can go to university if they want to.”

Nicholas Tatsima-Samaki 
Nicholas is a 27 year old from the village of Surur near Kibali. He joined Randgold as an assistant operator in the plant in 2013. Clever and dedicated, Nicholas has been promoted twice in three years and is now a crushing supervisor.

Nicholas explains, “I have some qualifications as a mechanic, but when I left school there was not much work so I was doing small jobs like construction to get money, and made about $80 - $100 a month. Working at Kibali, I have got some new skills and met some good people who are happy to help me and teach me new things. I want to have some more training to become a head of department and, if I work hard and keep learning, I know Randgold will keep helping me to achieve that.”

“Also our world has changed, it used to take three weeks to go to Aru now we can go in three hours. There are banks, there is more business and opportunities, our hospitals didn’t used to have any equipment, now they are better. We even have a football stadium and the whole area is proud of this and excited to go.”

  

Sustainability report
(English, PDF, 199.87 KB)